Andrew Martinsen's Walleye Fishing Update


Andrew Martinsen on How to Tie Crawler Harnesses
Build Your Own Tackle, Customized for You


Hey, Andrew Martinsen here. The great thing about crawler harnesses is that they do not have to be used just for worms. You can use leeches, minnows, and all types of plastic bait as well. Tying a worm harness does not have to be difficult or complex, and anyone can do it with no experience needed.




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The first step in tying a crawler harness is to pick up the hook in one hand, with the eyelet facing your other hand, and the line in the other. Thread the line one to two inches up and through the eye and then hold the line against the shank of the hook. Using the hand you have free now, pick up the loose line that is located near the line. Start the line around the shank, wrapping as close as possible as you go, making sure that each wrap goes toward the hook and away from the eye. Continue to wrap the line from between six to eight times, making sure to keep a tight tension on the line. Use a free finger on the hand which is holding the hook and press the knot, using just enough force to keep the knot from coming undone.

Now take the line and thread it in the opposite direction, so if you started by bringing the line up through the eye of the hook, you will end by bringing the line back down. Keep the knot tight and pull the line tight at the same time, and you can slide the knot in the direction of the hook eye if needed.

You have tied your hook perfectly.

Now place five beads down the fishing line in the direction of the hook. Pick up the clevis with the holes located on the blade's concave, or cupped side, and then put the clevis through the spinner blade hole. Now you have to thread your line through both of the clevis holes. It is important to ensure that the concave side of the blade faces the line, and the blade hole should always be on top and away from the hook. Never fasten a blade without using a clevis, or you may end up with your line cut. Now you simply add one more bead, higher than the spinner blade, to add a sound attraction. Next make a loop, tying an overhand knot with the last two inches of line doubled over, then pulling the knot tight. Trim off any extra line from the rig, but make sure that you leave a quarter of an inch to ensure the knots do not loosen. You have tied your crawler harness, now it's time to use it on the Walleye.

Great fishin to you!,

Andrew Martinsen




Sign up for FREE Walleye Fishing Tips

Sign up for a Complimentary Copy of My Report Called "Secret Sauce: The Bait Recipe for More and Bigger Walleyes"!

PLUS, you also get a complimentary subscription to my exclusive email publication, jam-packed with loads of "under-the-radar" walleye fishing tips that can help you to
catch walleyes fast!


* Privacy Guarantee: I solemnly pledge never to spam you or sell your email address to anyone, and of course you can unsubscribe at any time.




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